SHOP NOW—free delivery anywhere in Australia

Member Loginmenu
Your basket is empty

Upcoming Events

Griffith Review at The Wheeler Centre: Enduring Legacies

The stories we tell about war allow us to grapple with extreme and overwhelming experiences, to celebrate great sacrifices and condemn atrocities. But how do these shared mythologies form, and where should the line be drawn between what is deserving of commemoration and what is best left forgotten? What wartime stories remain untold, and why?

Griffith Review 48: Enduring Legacies draws together distinguished soldiers, military historians, academics and popular writers in a collection that goes against the grain of popular war narratives — uncovering the multifaceted legacies of people typically omitted from our commemoration of the wars of the twentieth century, and providing new insights, graphic portraits and telling analyses of their consequences. Contributor David Carlin recalls a lifelong family friendship forged by his grandfather and an Italian PoW; Joy Damousi explores the lingering war memories of the Greek diaspora in Australia, while Jeannine Baker illuminates the often unrecognised contributions of  women to war reporting and combat journalism.

Carlin, Damousi and Baker will join Griffith Review editor Julianne Schultz for a discussion about how conflict has shaped modern Australia at various levels — and how can we understand them more fully.

More information and bookings
right
Ramona Koval visits Aireys Inlet

Great Escape Books welcomes Ramona Koval to discuss her new memoir, Bloodhound: Searching for My Father.

Ramona's parents were Holocaust survivors who fled their homeland and settle in Melbourne.  As a child, Koval learned little abouth their lives but she always suspected that the man who raised her was not her biological father.  One day in the 1990's long after her mother's death, she decides she must know the truth.  A phone call leads to a photograph in the mail, then tea with strangers.

Before long Koval is interrogating a nursing-home patient, meeting a horse whisperer in tropical Queensland, journeying to rural Poland, learning othe languages and dealing with Kafkaesque bureaucracy, all in the hope of finding an answer.

A quest for identity recounted with Koval’s customary humour, Bloodhound takes hold of the reader and never lets go. It is a moving story of the terrible cost of war and of family secrets.

Ramona Koval is a Melbourne writer, journalist, broadcaster and editor. From 2006 to 2011 she presented Radio National’s Book Show, and she has written for the Age and the Australian. She is the author of By the Book: A Reader’s Guide to Life and Bloodhound: Searching For My Father.

To book please email myevents@greatescapebooks or phone (03) 5289 7052

Morning tea with Ramona Koval in Aireys Inlet

Due to popular demand, Great Escape Books will host Ramona Koval for a second event in Aireys Inlet. Ramona will discuss her new memoir, Bloodhound: Searching for My Father.

Ramona's parents were Holocaust survivors who fled their homeland and settle in Melbourne.  As a child, Koval learned little abouth their lives but she always suspected that the man who raised her was not her biological father.  One day in the 1990's long after her mother's death, she decides she must know the truth.  A phone call leads to a photograph in the mail, then tea with strangers.

Before long Koval is interrogating a nursing-home patient, meeting a horse whisperer in tropical Queensland, journeying to rural Poland, learning othe languages and dealing with Kafkaesque bureaucracy, all in the hope of finding an answer.

A quest for identity recounted with Koval’s customary humour, Bloodhound takes hold of the reader and never lets go. It is a moving story of the terrible cost of war and of family secrets.

Ramona Koval is a Melbourne writer, journalist, broadcaster and editor. From 2006 to 2011 she presented Radio National’s Book Show, and she has written for the Age and the Australian. She is the author of By the Book: A Reader’s Guide to Life and Bloodhound: Searching For My Father.

To book please email myevents@greatescapebooks or phone (03) 5289 7052

Anne Buist for Camberwell Library

Camberwell Library welcomes Anne Buist to discuss her new novel, Medea's Curse: Natalie King, Forensic Psychiatrist.

In Medea's Curse, forensic psychiatrist Natalie King works with victims and perpetrators of violent crime. Women with a history of abuse, mainly. She rides a Ducati a size too big and wears a tank top a size too small. Likes men but doesn’t want to keep one. And really needs to stay on her medication.

After receiving new information about an old case she still has regrets about, Natalie finds she is being stalked. Will she be able to unravel this case in time and keep her career intact?

A dark, sexy and gripping psychological thriller, Medea's Curse is about the devastating crimes perpetrated by women against their own children.

Anne Buist is the Chair of Women’s Mental Health at the University of Melbourne and has over 25 years clinical and research experience in perinatal psychiatry. She works with Protective Services and the legal system in cases of abuse, kidnapping, infanticide and murder. Medea’s Curse is her first mainstream psychological thriller.

Professor Buist is married to novelist Graeme Simsion and has two children.

More information and bookings
right
Text at the 2015 Batemans Bay Writers and Readers Festival

A slew of Text authors will be attending the 2015 Batemans Bay Writers and Readers Festival:

Anne Buist

Mark Henshaw

Linda Jaivin

Hannie Rayson

Graeme Simsion

More information and bookings
right
Ilka Tampke visits Paddington

Berkelouw Books Paddington invite you meet Ilka Tampke when she introduces her gripping new novel Skin.

Southwest Britain, AD 43. For the people of Caer Cad, "skin" is their belief, their greeting, their ancestors, their land. Ailia does not have skin. Abandoned at birth she serves the Tribequeen of her township. She is not permitted to marry, excluded from ceremonies and forbidden to learn. But the Mothers, the tribal ancestors, have chosen another path for her.

Skin is the thrilling and captivating story of a young woman's rise to power in Iron-Age Britain on the eve of the Roman invasion. A rousing tale of the collision of two societes, the making of a female leader, and the choices Ailia has to make amidst the storm-cloud of the Roman advance.

Ilka Tampke has undertaken incredible research and Skin is historically accurate in its depictions of the arrival of the modern world and what happens when an imperial culture imposes its power and crushes an ancient belief system.

Ilka Tampke was awarded a Glenfern Fellowship in 2012. Her short stories and articles have been published in several anthologies. She lives in Woodend, Australia. Skin is her first novel.

More information and bookings
right
Text at the 2015 Williamstown Literary Festival 2015

The 2015 Willy Lit Fest brings you talented writers producing gritty tales of crime, tender memoirs and family histories. 

Guests of the festival include:

Anne Buist

Helen Garner

Hannie Rayson

Jock Serong

Graeme Simsion

More information and bookings
right
LITLOLZ at the Wheeler Centre with Chris Flynn, Toni Jordan and Shane Maloney

Chris Flynn chats to Toni Jordan, Debra Oswald and Shane Maloney about how and why good writing can (and even should) make us smile.

Tolstoy tells us happy families are all alike. Raymond Chandler’s prescription for a good story includes a man with a gun. And writing teachers everywhere will tell you that conflict is the essential ingredient of plot.

But does that mean good writing has to be depressing and difficult?

Literature shelves are predictably packed with dysfunctional families, suicides, murders and anxiety. But surely it doesn’t have to be that way. Where’s the laughter, the levity and the light side of life in the pages of our books?

Celebrations of beloved books and characters are often dominated by the doomed Anna Karenina, cursed Cathy and Heathcliff, and other characters who seriously suffer. But we should equally celebrate unlikely romantic hero Don Tillman, unlucky (but laugh-a-minute) Candide, and other fictional characters who you don’t need to recover from after reading.

Chris Flynn is author of the novels The Glass Kingdom and A Tiger in Eden. His writing has appeared in Griffith ReviewMeanjinParis Review DailyMonster ChildrenSmith JournalSilent HistoryAgeAustralianBig Issue and many other publications. 

Toni Jordan's debut novel, Addition, was shortlisted for the Barbara Jefferis Award and longlisted for the Miles Franklin in 2009, and has been published in sixteen countries. Her second novel, Fall Girl, was published in 2010 and her latest, Nine Days, in 2012. 

Shane Maloney is one of Australia’s most popular novelists. His award-winning and much loved Murray Whelan series — StiffThe Brush-OffNice TryThe Big AskSomething Fishy and Sucked In — is characterised by a strong sense of humour and an acute sense of Melbourne’s political and cultural nuances.

More information and bookings
right
Sian Prior visits Balmain Library

Sian Prior has maintained a career in the public eye, as a broadcaster and performer, for more than twenty years. For far longer than that she has suffered from excruciating shyness. Eventually, she decides to investigate her condition. What is shyness? Where did hers come from? Why does it create such distressing turmoil beneath her assured professional front?

Shy: A Memoir—frank, provocative, remarkable in its clarity and beautifully written—is a book about unease: about questioning who you are and evading the answer. It is about grief, and abandonment and loss. It is about how the simple word shy belies the complex reality of what that really means.

Sian Prior is a journalist and broadcaster specialising in the arts and popular culture, a media consultant, and a teacher at universities and writers centres. She has a second career as a musician and recording artist.

More information and bookings
right
Ramona Koval and Krissy Kneen in Eumundi

















Eumundi welcomes Ramona Koval and Krissy Kneen to discuss their new books. 

Ramona Koval’s parents were Holocaust survivors who fled their homeland and settled in Melbourne. As a child, Koval learned little about their lives—only snippets from traumatic tales of destruction and escape. But she always suspected that the man who raised her was not her biological father.

Bloodhound is a moving tale of the terrible cost of war and of family secrets.

Ramona Koval is a Melbourne writer, journalist, broadcaster and editor. From 2006 to 2011 she presented Radio National’s Book Show, and she has written for the Age and the Australian. She is the author of By the Book: A Reader’s Guide to Life, and Bloodhound: Searching For My Father.

In Krissy Kneen's new novel, The Adventures of Holly White and the Incredible Sex Machine, Holly wears a ring that says True Love Waits and worries because her boyfriend isn’t trying to persuade her otherwise. Then a boy in her English tute invites her to join his book club.

Shocked to find herself at ‘sex club’, plunged into in the classics of erotic literature, Holly soon becomes fascinated: by the strange new world of Eros, by the increasing power she senses in her own body—and by a weird blue glow emanating from the most private part of her self.

This amazing literary sci-fi superhero sex romp from Australia's genre-bending queen of erotica is sure to make for an exciting event!

Krissy Kneen has been shortlisted three times for the Queensland Premier's Literary Award and in 2014 won the Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize.

She is the author of a short collection of erotica, Swallow the Sound, a memoir, Affection, a collection of erotica entitles, Triptych and her literary novel Steeplechase.

Presented by the Sunshine Hinterland Writers Centre.

Tickets available at the door.