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The Goddess Chronicle

The Goddess Chronicle

Natsuo Kirino

Translated by Rebecca Copeland

From bestselling author Natsuo Kirino comes a chilling story of retribution and one woman’s revenge.

Two sisters, Namima and Kamikuu, born to the family of the oracle, are separated as children. Kamikuu begins her training to become the next oracle, while Namima becomes Priestess of the Night.

The Goddess Chronicle
—a retelling of the ancient Japanese myth of Izanami and Izanagi—pulls the reader deep into the realm of the undead.

Japanese crime queen Natsuo Kirino’s dark, twisted tale is a fantastical, fabulous tour-de-force.  It is a dazzling story of sex, death, gods and revenge that will draw the reader in and won’t let go until the exhilarating end.

Natsuo Kirino
About the Author

Natsuo Kirino is a leading Japanese writer of hard-boiled crime fiction. She is best known for her 1998 novel, Out, which received the Grand Prix for Crime Fiction, Japan’s top mystery award, and was a finalist (in translation) for the 2004 Edgar Award. Three other novels, Grotesque, Real World and What Remains have been translated into English....

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Extent:
256pp
Format:
Paperback
Publication date:
30 January 2013
ISBN:
9781922079084
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Praise for Natsuo Kirino
andThe Goddess Chronicle

‘A spectacle that includes multiple layers of opposing forces: life and death, love and hate…The author uniquely depicts an unruly mythological world.’

‘[Kirino] broadens our sense of what modern Japanese fiction can be.' 

‘Daring and disturbing … [Kirino is] prepared to push the human limits of this world … Remarkable’

‘The central narrative is lyrical, with an impelling storyline that demands attention – not to mention one of the finest, and least expected, first lines of a chapter I have ever read. This is a compelling tale, with foundations in an allegory-rich fable that more than deserves its rejuvenation.’

‘Kirino enjoys depicting her heavenly characters as capricious and temperamental, much like the Greek gods. Yet despite the very human motivations of all involved, Kirino maintains an air of intriguing supernatural strangeness.’

‘Kirino wows with her latest novel…[her] elegant writing brings Namima—a tragic, sympathetic heroine—to vivid life. Readers will devour this tragic story and be left transformed.’

‘Kirino is a master at creating an atmosphere of unease and distrust between her characters. In her skilful hands we see that the divide between man and woman is greater than the one between humans and gods. Kirino’s retelling is a taut, disturbing and timeless tale, filled with rage and pathos for the battles that women have to fight every day, battles which have, apparently, existed from the moment of creation.’

‘The central narrative is lyrical, with an impelling storyline that demands attention – not to mention one of the finest, and least expected, first lines of a chapter I have ever read. This is a compelling tale, with foundations in an allegory-rich fable that more than deserves its rejuvenation.’